5 Weight loss and nutrition myths

  1. Myth: Fad diets will help me lose weight and keep it off

 

Fact: Fad diets are not the best way to lose weight and keep it off. These diets often promise quick weight loss if you strictly reduce what you eat or avoid some types of foods. Some of these diets may help you lose weight at first. But these diets are hard

to follow. Most people quickly get tired of them and regain any lost weight.

Fad diets may be unhealthy. They may not provide all of the nutrients your body needs. Also, losing more than 3 pounds a week after the first few weeks

may increase your chances of developing gallstones (solid matter in the gallbladder that can cause pain). Being on a diet of fewer than 800 calories a day for

a long time may lead to serious heart problems.

 

  1. Myth: Grain products such as bread, pasta, and rice are fattening

 

Fact: A grain product is any food made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley, or another cereal grain. Grains are divided into two subgroups, whole grains and refined grains. Whole grains contain the entire grain kernel—the bran, germ and endosperm. Examples include brown rice and whole-wheat bread, cereal, and pasta. Refined

grains have been milled, a process that removes the bran and germ. This is done to give grains a finer texture and improve their shelf life, but it also removes dietary fibre, iron, and many B vitamins. People who eat whole grains as part of a healthy

diet may lower their chances of developing some chronic diseases. Government dietary guidelines advise making half your grains whole grains. For example, choose 100 percent whole-wheat bread instead of white bread, and brown rice instead of

white rice.

 

  1. Myth: Some people can eat whatever they want and still lose weight.

Fact: To lose weight, you need to burn more calories than you eat and drink. Some people may seem to get away with eating any kind of food they want and

still lose weight. But those people, like everyone, must use more energy than they take in through food and drink to lose weight.

 

  1. Myth: Fast foods are always an unhealthy choice.

 

 Fact: Many fast foods are unhealthy and may affect weight gain. However, if you do eat fast food, choose menu options with care. Both at home and away, choose healthy foods that are nutrient rich, low in calories, and small in portion size.

 

  1. Myth: Lifting weights will make me “bulk up.”

Fact: Lifting weights or doing activities such as push-ups and crunches on a regular basis can help you build strong muscles, which can help you burn

more calories. To strengthen muscles, you can lift weights, use large rubber bands (resistance bands), do push-ups or sit-ups, or do household or yard tasks that make you lift or dig. Doing strengthening activities 2 or 3 days a week will not “bulk you up.”

Only intense strength training, along with certain genetics, can build large muscles.